Lector Works

Ordinary Time 10 (B)
Home
The Coming Week
Get in Touch
Nativity (Vigil)
Nativity (Midnight)
Nativity (Dawn)
Nativity (Day)
Mary, Mother of God
Epiphany
Triduum - Lord's Supper
Triduum - Passion and Death
Triduum - Easter Vigil
Easter Sunday
Pentecost Vigil
Pentecost
Nativity John Baptist
Sts. Peter & Paul
Transfiguration
Assumption
Holy Cross
All Saints
All Souls
St. John Lateran
Advent 1 (A)
Advent 2 (A)
Advent 3 (A)
Advent 4 (A)
Holy Family (A)
Baptism (A)
Lent 1 (A)
Lent 2 (A)
Lent 3 (A)
Lent 4 (A)
Lent 5 (A)
Passion Sunday (A)
Easter 2 (A)
Easter 3 (A)
Easter 4 (A)
Easter 5 (A)
Easter 6 (A)
Ascension (A)
Easter 7 (A)
Trinity Sunday (A)
Corpus Christi (A)
Ordinary Time 2 (A)
Ordinary Time 3 (A)
Ordinary Time 4 (A)
Ordinary Time 5 (A)
Ordinary Time 6 (A)
Ordinary Time 7 (A)
Ordinary Time 8 (A)
Ordinary Time 9 (A)
Ordinary Time 10 (A)
Ordinary Time 11 (A)
Ordinary Time 12 (A)
Ordinary Time 13 (A)
Ordinary Time 14 (A)
Ordinary Time 15 (A)
Ordinary Time 16 (A)
Ordinary Time 17 (A)
Ordinary Time 18 (A)
Ordinary Time 19 (A)
Ordinary Time 20 (A)
Ordinary Time 21 (A)
Ordinary Time 22 (A)
Ordinary Time 23 (A)
Ordinary Time 24 (A)
Ordinary Time 25 (A)
Ordinary Time 26 (A)
Ordinary Time 27 (A)
Ordinary Time 28 (A)
Ordinary Time 29 (A)
Ordinary Time 30 (A)
Ordinary Time 31 (A)
Ordinary Time 32 (A)
Ordinary Time 33 (A)
Christ the King (A)
Advent 1 (B)
Advent 2 (B)
Advent 3 (B)
Advent 4 (B)
Holy Family (B)
Baptism (B)
Lent 1 (B)
Lent 2 (B)
Lent 3 (B)
Lent 4 (B)
Lent 5 (B)
Passion Sunday (B)
Easter 2 (B)
Easter 3 (B)
Easter 4 (B)
Easter 5 (B)
Easter 6 (B)
Ascension (B)
Easter 7 (B)
Trinity Sunday (B)
Corpus Christi (B)
Ordinary Time 2 (B)
Ordinary Time 3 (B)
Ordinary Time 4 (B)
Ordinary Time 5 (B)
Ordinary Time 6 (B)
Ordinary Time 7 (B)
Ordinary Time 8 (B)
Ordinary Time 9 (B)
Ordinary Time 10 (B)
Ordinary Time 11 (B)
Ordinary Time 12 (B)
Ordinary Time 13 (B)
Ordinary Time 14 (B)
Ordinary Time 15 (B)
Ordinary Time 16 (B)
Ordinary Time 17 (B)
Ordinary Time 18 (B)
Ordinary Time 19 (B)
Ordinary Time 20 (B)
Ordinary Time 21 (B)
Ordinary Time 22 (B)
Ordinary Time 23 (B)
Ordinary Time 24 (B)
Ordinary Time 25 (B)
Ordinary Time 26 (B)
Ordinary Time 27 (B)
Ordinary Time 28 (B)
Ordinary Time 29 (B)
Ordinary Time 30 (B)
Ordinary Time 31 (B)
Ordinary Time 32 (B)
Ordinary Time 33 (B)
Christ the King (B)
Advent 1 (C)
Advent 2 (C)
Advent 3 (C)
Advent 4 (C)
Holy Family (C)
Baptism (C)
Lent 1 (C)
Lent 2 (C)
Lent 3 (C)
Lent 4 (C)
Lent 5 (C)
Passion Sunday (C)
Easter 2 (C)
Easter 3 (C)
Easter 4 (C)
Easter 5 (C)
Easter 6 (C)
Ascension C
Easter 7 (C)
Trinity Sunday (C)
Corpus Christi (C)
Ordinary Time 2 (C)
Ordinary Time 3 (C)
Ordinary Time 4 (C)
Ordinary Time 5 (C)
Ordinary Time 6 (C)
Ordinary Time 7 (C)
Ordinary Time 8 (C)
Ordinary Time 9 (C)
Ordinary Time 10 (C)
Ordinary Time 11 (C)
Ordinary Time 12 (C)
Ordinary Time 13 (C)
Ordinary Time 14 (C)
Ordinary Time 15 (C)
Ordinary Time 16 (C)
Ordinary Time 17 (C)
Ordinary Time 18 (C)
Ordinary Time 19 (C)
Ordinary Time 20 (C)
Ordinary Time 21 (C)
Ordinary Time 22 (C)
Ordinary Time 23 (C)
Ordinary Time 24 (C)
Ordinary Time 25 (C)
Ordinary Time 26 (C)
Ordinary Time 27 (C)
Ordinary Time 28 (C)
Ordinary Time 29 (C)
Ordinary Time 30 (C)
Ordinary Time 31 (C)
Ordinary Time 32 (C)
Ordinary Time 33 (C)
Christ the King (C)

Readings for the Tenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Cycle B

 

1. Genesis 3, 9-15

  • I hear a portion of the ancient story of the Fall.  The Lord God called to the man and asked him, and the man and woman answer him.  Our interpretations change from one era to another but the same dialog remains, preserved in its economy of language and unadorned truth. 
  • What does it mean for our church today, fresh from its celebration of Pentecost?  Let me help my listeners find the message for themselves. 
  • In the light of today’s Gospel passage, it would signal the opening round in the eternal struggle over our calling to faithfulness and obedience to God.  Of course, we do not hear those words here, nor any explicit mention of evil or sin.
  • Where are you?  Could we be so lost that not even God can find us?  Or, rather, does not God expect us to be in the usual place, wanting us to return there?  I think it is a moral question, because the man takes it as moral, and I will speak it that way.  I was afraid so I hid myself.
  • Who told you that you were naked?  You have eaten from the tree!  I interpret God’s voice as one of a mentor, who discovers the truth, rather than as one of an accuser.  In the Bible, Satan is the principal accuser.
  • The man says: The woman – she gave me fruit, so I ate it.  The woman says: The serpent tricked me, so I ate it.  They both speak as those who deny all responsibility for their actions.  I think this is the primal sin of humanity, if sin is to be found in this passage.  I will speak their lines with a certain defiance, as if they are saying: You see, it happened.  Now what are you going to do about it?
  • In the story God curses each of the three creatures.  Today we only get to hear the pronouncement upon the serpent: You shall be banned, on your belly shall you crawl, and dirt shall you eat.  I remember that I am reading a creation myth, not a guide to reptiles.  Israel’s neighbors made carved images of serpents for use in fertility rites, and the one God of Israel means to reduce them to the mean status that should be theirs.  They are not to be feared and worshipped but abhorred from a safe distance.  There will be enmity between you and the woman, and between your offspring and hers. 
  • Our translation makes the offspring masculine: He will strike at your head.  Many Greek commentators in the beginning found a reference to Jesus Christ as he trampled upon sin and death.  (Latin commentators celebrated a feminine reference that reminded them of Mary.)
  • Climax: The story of the Fall is basically unfinished as it stands, waiting for its resolution until humanity recovers fullness of life in God.  But I would place my emphasis on the enmity between ourselves and all that threatens our existence.
  • Message for our assembly: Is there a greater sin we can commit than our indifference to the consequences of our actions?  See today’s Gospel.
  • I will challenge myself: To repeat the dialog faithfully as I find it, allowing the familiar words to catch our attention again and keeping God’s perspective on what has happened.  God has the first word and the last word today.

2. II Corinthians 4, 13 – 5, 1

  • I hear the apostle speaking words of encouragement to the young church.  We continue to bask in the Easter glow, and many of the references point to Easter.  The one who raised the Lord Jesus will raise us also with Jesus. 
  • We have the same spirit of faith according to what is written.  In other words, we share the spirit of faith that is expressed in this psalm verse.  I believed, therefore I spoke.  Not all scholars agree with this translation from the Hebrew, but no one can criticize the attitude of the apostle.  We don’t hold our faith inside ourselves, but we declare it openly.
  • The grace bestowed on more and more people may cause the thanksgiving to overflow.  Here is a textbook example of how a literal translation of the apostle’s words can obscure the meaning.  ‘Grace’ would mean the life of grace in Christ, and ‘thanksgiving’ refers to the prayer of the church that echoes the hymn of the angels – that is, our prayer today.  A vibrant church that receives new members would understand this phrase.  I can convey a sense of the wonder by lifting my voice throughout the sentence until I reach for the glory of God.
  • It begins to sound like a person counting her blessings, and using them to explain why she is not upset by adversity in her life.  At the beginning of the passage: We believe.  At the midpoint: Therefore we are not discouraged.
  • The message for our assembly: All is not as it appears.  We see adversity, little defeats and blows to our self-confidence.  The eyes of faith see an eternal weight of glory beyond all comparison.  What is seen is transitory.
  • Central theme: Encouragement, because the reality of the resurrection overshadows everything else in our lives.
  • I will challenge myself: To remind myself of the apostle’s confidence, and to pray for a share of it, as the gift that will help the sometimes obscure grammar of this reading to reach the people today in all its spiritual force.

 

Gospel. Mark 3, 20-35

  • Every time I hear the words, He is out of his mind, I remember what the world thinks of dedicated men and women who in their zeal for justice have no time even to eat.  The world regards the messenger rather than the message!
  • Other onlookers, not so kindly disposed, called Jesus possessed by Beelzebul.  It is a hostile environment.  How does Jesus answer?  I hear several lessons, likely the kernels of wisdom from several speeches.  How can Satan drive out Satan?  If a kingdom is divided against itself, that kingdom cannot stand. 
  • I also hear a severe sentence: Whoever blasphemes against the Holy Spirit will never have forgiveness.  In a time of so many acts of summary judgment in the various church establishments, I will emphasize the witness in this first Gospel that the work of the Spirit must not be condemned.
  • Ahem, Jesus!  Your mother and your brothers are outside asking for you.  The world, even we ourselves, expect Jesus to behave as we would.  Let me listen to his ways, his values, and let me meet my greater family.
  • Climax: At the end of the passage Jesus welcomes the stranger into his family: Here are my mother and my brothers: whoever does the will of God.
  • Message for our assembly: Jesus shows us the Father through hard and combative times as well as times of compassion.
  • I will challenge myself: To let the confrontation loose in my own telling.

Enter content here

Enter content here

Enter content here

Enter supporting content here