Lector Works

Mary, Mother of God
Home
The Coming Week
Get in Touch
Nativity (Vigil)
Nativity (Midnight)
Nativity (Dawn)
Nativity (Day)
Mary, Mother of God
Epiphany
Triduum - Lord's Supper
Triduum - Passion and Death
Triduum - Easter Vigil
Easter Sunday
Pentecost Vigil
Pentecost
Nativity John Baptist
Sts. Peter & Paul
Transfiguration
Assumption
Holy Cross
All Saints
All Souls
St. John Lateran
Advent 1 (A)
Advent 2 (A)
Advent 3 (A)
Advent 4 (A)
Holy Family (A)
Baptism (A)
Lent 1 (A)
Lent 2 (A)
Lent 3 (A)
Lent 4 (A)
Lent 5 (A)
Passion Sunday (A)
Easter 2 (A)
Easter 3 (A)
Easter 4 (A)
Easter 5 (A)
Easter 6 (A)
Ascension (A)
Easter 7 (A)
Trinity Sunday (A)
Corpus Christi (A)
Ordinary Time 2 (A)
Ordinary Time 3 (A)
Ordinary Time 4 (A)
Ordinary Time 5 (A)
Ordinary Time 6 (A)
Ordinary Time 7 (A)
Ordinary Time 8 (A)
Ordinary Time 9 (A)
Ordinary Time 10 (A)
Ordinary Time 11 (A)
Ordinary Time 12 (A)
Ordinary Time 13 (A)
Ordinary Time 14 (A)
Ordinary Time 15 (A)
Ordinary Time 16 (A)
Ordinary Time 17 (A)
Ordinary Time 18 (A)
Ordinary Time 19 (A)
Ordinary Time 20 (A)
Ordinary Time 21 (A)
Ordinary Time 22 (A)
Ordinary Time 23 (A)
Ordinary Time 24 (A)
Ordinary Time 25 (A)
Ordinary Time 26 (A)
Ordinary Time 27 (A)
Ordinary Time 28 (A)
Ordinary Time 29 (A)
Ordinary Time 30 (A)
Ordinary Time 31 (A)
Ordinary Time 32 (A)
Ordinary Time 33 (A)
Christ the King (A)
Advent 1 (B)
Advent 2 (B)
Advent 3 (B)
Advent 4 (B)
Holy Family (B)
Baptism (B)
Lent 1 (B)
Lent 2 (B)
Lent 3 (B)
Lent 4 (B)
Lent 5 (B)
Passion Sunday (B)
Easter 2 (B)
Easter 3 (B)
Easter 4 (B)
Easter 5 (B)
Easter 6 (B)
Ascension (B)
Easter 7 (B)
Trinity Sunday (B)
Corpus Christi (B)
Ordinary Time 2 (B)
Ordinary Time 3 (B)
Ordinary Time 4 (B)
Ordinary Time 5 (B)
Ordinary Time 6 (B)
Ordinary Time 7 (B)
Ordinary Time 8 (B)
Ordinary Time 9 (B)
Ordinary Time 10 (B)
Ordinary Time 11 (B)
Ordinary Time 12 (B)
Ordinary Time 13 (B)
Ordinary Time 14 (B)
Ordinary Time 15 (B)
Ordinary Time 16 (B)
Ordinary Time 17 (B)
Ordinary Time 18 (B)
Ordinary Time 19 (B)
Ordinary Time 20 (B)
Ordinary Time 21 (B)
Ordinary Time 22 (B)
Ordinary Time 23 (B)
Ordinary Time 24 (B)
Ordinary Time 25 (B)
Ordinary Time 26 (B)
Ordinary Time 27 (B)
Ordinary Time 28 (B)
Ordinary Time 29 (B)
Ordinary Time 30 (B)
Ordinary Time 31 (B)
Ordinary Time 32 (B)
Ordinary Time 33 (B)
Christ the King (B)
Advent 1 (C)
Advent 2 (C)
Advent 3 (C)
Advent 4 (C)
Holy Family (C)
Baptism (C)
Lent 1 (C)
Lent 2 (C)
Lent 3 (C)
Lent 4 (C)
Lent 5 (C)
Passion Sunday (C)
Easter 2 (C)
Easter 3 (C)
Easter 4 (C)
Easter 5 (C)
Easter 6 (C)
Ascension C
Easter 7 (C)
Trinity Sunday (C)
Corpus Christi (C)
Ordinary Time 2 (C)
Ordinary Time 3 (C)
Ordinary Time 4 (C)
Ordinary Time 5 (C)
Ordinary Time 6 (C)
Ordinary Time 7 (C)
Ordinary Time 8 (C)
Ordinary Time 9 (C)
Ordinary Time 10 (C)
Ordinary Time 11 (C)
Ordinary Time 12 (C)
Ordinary Time 13 (C)
Ordinary Time 14 (C)
Ordinary Time 15 (C)
Ordinary Time 16 (C)
Ordinary Time 17 (C)
Ordinary Time 18 (C)
Ordinary Time 19 (C)
Ordinary Time 20 (C)
Ordinary Time 21 (C)
Ordinary Time 22 (C)
Ordinary Time 23 (C)
Ordinary Time 24 (C)
Ordinary Time 25 (C)
Ordinary Time 26 (C)
Ordinary Time 27 (C)
Ordinary Time 28 (C)
Ordinary Time 29 (C)
Ordinary Time 30 (C)
Ordinary Time 31 (C)
Ordinary Time 32 (C)
Ordinary Time 33 (C)
Christ the King (C)

Readings for the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God

 

1. Numbers 6, 22-27

  • Today I am fortunate to be able to repeat this blessing from God for the people.  The Lord bless you and keep you. 
  • I remember the blessing that parents give to their little ones.  We want God to take care of them when they are away from us.  Some of us continue asking for the blessing even as adults. 
  • But listen further to how you shall bless the Israelites.  There is more than safety at stake here.  The Lord let his face shine upon you and be gracious to you.  Doesn’t this sound like prosperity, like the prayer of Jabez?  Listen and repeat it.
  • Finally, the third blessing.  The Lord look upon you kindly and give you peace.  Now we go beyond material well-being to a realm where God’s designs are at work, where all of God’s goodness is reflected, and where the Spirit’s fruits are fully realized (one of which is peace).
  • The Catholic Church celebrates the first day of the year as a Universal Day of Peace.  That custom, begun with Paul the Sixth, would be another reason for adopting this reading today.
  • Central theme: We receive a wonderful blessing, but our focus is on The Lord who gives the blessing and who gives it lavishly.  These gifts shared with us by God are for us to share with others, not to hoard for ourselves.
  • Message for our assembly: How can we appreciate this gift of safety, prosperity and peace?  How can we share it with the world around us?
  • I will challenge myself: To speak the blessing like the loving father I try to be.

 

2. Galatians 4, 4-7

  • Today we hear the earliest Incarnation (Christmas) story in the New Testament.  When the fullness of time had come God sent his Son, born of a woman. 
  • I hear traces of the apostle’s perennial ‘stump speech’ and his awareness of the new Covenant.  Born under the law, to ransom those under the law.
  • The revisions of the Lectionary demanded by the institution continue to rely on phrases that once described a collective humanity, such as ‘son.’  Here that word is used four times.  Because I acknowledge that such words no longer carry the collective connotation in our common speech, I will not emphasize them here.  For example, in the phrase adoption as sons I will come down strong on ‘adoption.’  The same approach is possible with the other appearances of the word.
  • The message for our assembly: Jesus came for us, to bring us nearer to God.  Do we sense the nearness of God?  Can one of those intimate hymns help us?  Let us work to achieve an awareness of the Spirit crying in our hearts, Abba!
  • Climax: The meaning of the Incarnation is what it achieves in us who are witnesses to it.  We receive adoption as sons.  You are no longer a slave but a son, and if a son then also an heir.
  • I will challenge myself: To step gradually from the doctrine of Christ’s birth to its implications for us as God’s children, downplaying the collective son while at the same time building to the climactic word heir.

 

Gospel. Luke 2, 16-21

  • One week ago, at the dawn liturgy of the Nativity, I heard nearly these same Gospel verses.  What fresh approach can I bring to them now?
  • Last week we marked the coming of the child and celebrated the safe landing of the God who came to dwell among his people.  Today we mark the recovery of his mother, and her own discoveries about her child after the birth.
  • The shepherds were told about the infant wrapped in bands of cloth and lying in a manger.  What they found was Mary and Joseph and the infant. 
  • The shepherds first hear it: The message that had been told them about this child.  How do they respond?  They made known the message.  And on their return to the pastures, they glorified and praised God. 
  • Now it is the turn of the people of Bethlehem to hear it.  How do they respond?  All who heard it were amazed.  Of course, that includes Mary and Joseph.
  • Finally, Mary kept all these things, reflecting on them in her heart.  I will read this as part of the previous sentence.  Everyone else who was amazed eventually forgot about it.  But Mary kept pondering its meaning, as she came to grips with the implications of everything that was happening to her.  In my own declaration of the passage, I mean to bring out the evangelist’s point: that Mary went further.  Of course, she was the first person to spread the good news of her son’s birth.
  • The last verse of today’s Gospel became the ‘short Gospel’ that was formerly read in isolation on this eighth day after the Nativity, formerly called Circumcision Day in memory of the day on which he was named Jesus.  If the prophets’ words begin to be fulfilled with the coming and birth of the Lord, the circumcision and naming of Jesus continue the path of fulfillment.
  • Central theme: The passage is permeated with proclamations of good news.  Luke is reminding us that God’s presence among us is something to be excited about, and shared with others in that same excitement.  I recall that Luke is also the evangelist of the Holy Spirit, and enthusiasm is a gift of the Spirit.
  • Message for our assembly: Unlike in our secular year, the celebration is just beginning for the church.  It will carry over into Ordinary Time.  Let’s build upon the joy we felt at the Nativity.
  • I will challenge myself: To convey through my reading some of  that enthusiasm the church so badly needs to recover.

Toward the Eucharist:  To whose family do we belong as we process forward?  Is the living memory of Mary and the presence of her son among us making a difference in our communion?

Enter content here

Enter content here

Enter content here

Enter supporting content here